Auteur Topic: Japanse Tailor`s  (2262 keer gelezen)

Michael

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Japanse Tailor`s
Gepost op: 17 november 2007 – 13:22:18
Gister vernomen dat Osjee vanaf volgend jaar diverse Japanse pakken merken gaat verkopen; de japanse tailors zijn in aantocht aldus Martijn.

Zal vd week wel wat (web) adresjes laten vallen hier.

Hoe denkt men hier erover? Japans ipv italiaans?

Bogart

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Japanse Tailor`s
Reactie #1 Gepost op: 17 november 2007 – 13:45:15
Vindt het allebei lekker.

Daedalus

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Reactie #2 Gepost op: 17 november 2007 – 14:24:11
Dit kwam ik tegen na een beetje googlen:

http://www.filmnoirbuff.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=1037&p=1

http://www.gintei.com/
http://www.gintei.com/handmade/making_1.html serie videos

2 voorbeeldjes
Citaat van: "Twin Six"
Today finally I went into Ginza Tailor to learn about their various bespoke options. I have been promising this trip for several weeks, and after a night filled with various and sundry sartorial dreams, I was determined that today should be the day that I make my first foray into the world of bespoke tailoring.

I braved the pouring rain and set off for Ginza, which is only about 20 minutes from where I live. Arriving at the modest portal to Ginza Tailor, I took the elevator up to their 3rd floor showroom, where I was greeted by a the receptionist, a rather elegant middle-aged lady, to whom I explained that I had come to inquire about their suiting options. She made a telephone call and presently a young woman entered the spacious and well-lit showroom. The receptionist brought me a hot towel and green tea while the young lady who was to be my guide began telling me about their various suiting options.

She explained that there are basically two options, the Samurai, which is bespoke with a majority of the work machine-sewn and the details hand-sewn, and the fully Hand Made bespoke. The Samurai has a baseline price of around $1200 equivalent with prices going up to an average of around $2500 depending on the material chosen. One very attractive option available with the Samurai is a lining detail using colorful silks from a renowned weaver in the famous Nishijin weaving district of Kyoto. Other unique details available are lacquered buttons and your signature embroidered in kanji inside the lining. Of course, details like working sleeve buttons are available for a nominal sum and you can specify every aspect of the silhouette, button stance and lapel shape, width, gorge height, etc., etc., etc. at no extra cost, as the young lady explained. Hey, this is bespoke. They even make bespoke jeans!

After about an hour of learning about all the different options available, it was time to go upstairs to the 4th floor to see the fabrics. This was a visual and sensory experience like no other as the young lady took out bolt after bolt of gorgeous fabric for my delectation. Of course, many of you are acquainted with the joys of such an experience, but this being my first time, it was somewhat akin to being a kid let loose in a candy store. I spent well over an hour looking through the books and asking more questions. The young lady and I were joined by a gentleman who then took over as guide, helping me through the numerous fabrics and complimenting me on my sensitivity to the subtleties of the various colors and textures. I inquired about a dinner jacket and was shown yet another book and given an estimate of around $3500. Then I asked about their shirtings and was shown a dazzling array of options at prices that make them a far better value than my BB custom shirts (BB in Japan offers neither slim fit nor MOP buttons).

After a great deal of discussion, I was invited up to the 8th floor to observe the tailors making suits (watch the video series). I don't believe there was a single man under 60 among the tailors working with intense concentration in that room. Each suit is crafted from beginning to end by a single tailor. I watched the tailor closest to me make the ticket pocket of a deliciously rich tweed jacket, the finished sleeves of which hung next to where he was working. When he was done, he handed it to my guide so I could inspect his handiwork at close range.

At length it was time to go, and as my guide and I rode down in the elevator, he explained to me about their Friday night jazz salon in which they feature young and aspiring musicians. They also have a hair and manicure salon, which is not so outrageously priced that I wouldn't consider going there. The small talk concluded, I was helped on with my coat and then thanked the staff and bid them adieu. Stepping out onto the street, where the rain had since stopped, I felt that giddily disoriented feeling one gets when exiting a movie theater after a particularly breath-taking film and realizing once again that the mundane world exists and you have work to do and bills to pay, and yet the magic remains. I now have no doubt about where my next suit is coming from, whether I need one or not.





Citaat van: "Twin Six"
I've just returned home from Ginza Tailor, where I tried on my new suit and shirt. The shirt fits beautifully and is extremely comfortable. The suit, however, had a bit of a bulge and fold in the right-hand chest area, and whether it bothered me or not (which it did), Mr. Hirata, my cutter, was not going to let the suit leave the premises in that state. He apologized repeatedly and asked me if I needed the suit for any occasion in the near future. I assured him I would not. He explained that the bulge was because my right shoulder is lower than my left and that he would have it fixed by next Saturday. When I put my RL MTM suit back on, we noticed the same sort of bulge, though somewhat less pronounced.

This time I took photos:

Hirata-san laying out the suit jacket. Note how he is dressed. The shoes are kiltie tassel loafers. Note also the pocket configuration of the jacket.



A good pic of the fabrics used for both the suit and the pocket detailing as well as the buttons.



Note the kanji monogram. You can almost discern the difference in shade between the inner and outer sides of the suiting fabric



My new pink shirt with thin MOP buttons and grey buttonhole stitching. Note the angled cuff and pocket corners.



cyka blyat

Rogier

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Reactie #3 Gepost op: 17 november 2007 – 14:55:21
Kan van dat spul niet echt warm worden, maar ze maken vast ook mooie dingen. Maar ik sta iig niet te springen om over te stappen. :lol:
This, madame, is Versailles.

Timothy

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Japanse Tailor`s
Reactie #4 Gepost op: 17 november 2007 – 15:01:11
Citaat van: "Rogier"
Kan van dat spul niet echt warm worden, maar ze maken vast ook mooie dingen. Maar ik sta iig niet te springen om over te stappen. :lol:


Volgens mij voegt het niet echt iets toe aan het huidige aanbod.
Voor Japanners zelf natuurlijk wel fijn.
"I feel sorry for people who don't drink, when they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day" - Frank Sinatra

Sergio

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Japanse Tailor`s
Reactie #5 Gepost op: 17 november 2007 – 17:44:17
Er zijn veel goede tailors die niet italiaans zijn maar voor mij missen ze vrijwel allemaal de "perfecte imperfectie". Dát maakt italiaanse producten voor mij zo mooi.
If something seems too good to be true, it probably is.
Never expect to get a lot by paying a little
Style isn't a question of life or death: it's much more important than that.


Vanità - modern tailors

Mikey Fuoco

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Reactie #6 Gepost op: 17 november 2007 – 18:17:35
Mooi gesproken Sergio.

Pietro

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Japanse Tailor`s
Reactie #7 Gepost op: 26 november 2007 – 20:01:34
Japanse tailors zijn vooral erg Brits en Amerikaans. Op Ginza zie je vrij veel van deze winkels, al prefereert het merendeel van de Japanners gewoon de Italiaanse snit. Verder is CoolBiz helemaal hip, maar daar word je niet vrolijk van. Als die Japanse sales mannen in een shirt met korte mouwen.  :?