Auteur Topic: Afneembare boorden  (2919 keer gelezen)

Daedalus

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Afneembare boorden
Gepost op: 21 januari 2009 – 00:34:51
Hoe rijmen de heren dit met het feit dat voor WOII bijna alle shirts afneembare boorden en manchetten hadden? Zodat shirts meerdere malen gedragen konden worden en vieze boorden en manchetten gewoon werden vervangen door een ander setje.
Laatst bewerkt op: 11 februari 2009 – 21:01:10 door Daedalus
cyka blyat

Dantès

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Re: Garderobe samenstellen, aanvullen en onderhouden
Reactie #1 Gepost op: 21 januari 2009 – 10:56:16
Dank voor de link Sergio maar dat stuk van Will, whoever that may be, bevat slechts een observatie over "zijn omgeving" en kan moeilijk beschouwd worden als een verklaring van de oorsprong van witte boorden en manchetten op gekleurde shirts. In ieder geval bevestigt ook hij dat het vervangen (of keren) van boorden en manchetten bepaald niet een 'poor man's solution' is.

@Daedalus: het een sluit het ander niet uit. De afneembare boorden en manchetten zijn inderdaad na WOII praktisch uit beeld verdwenen maar vaste boorden en manchetten deden al hun intrede aan het eind van de 19e eeuw. Het ontzettende gehannes met die afneembare boorden en manchetten deed de meeste heren besluiten over te stappen op de veel praktischere vaste exemplaren. Overigens zijn afneembare boorden en manchetten pas in de eerste helft van de 19e eeuw 'uitgevonden' - daarvoor zaten ze nog gewoon, net zoals vandaag de dag, vast.

Edzardo

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Re: Garderobe samenstellen, aanvullen en onderhouden
Reactie #2 Gepost op: 21 januari 2009 – 11:09:03
Hoe rijmen de heren dit met het feit dat voor WOII bijna alle shirts afneembare boorden en manchetten hadden?

Ik zag dit laatst in (jaja) "Are you being served", maar begreep dit al niet helemaal. Hoe werkt dit praktisch, heeft iemand misschien een plaatje?

Edzardo

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Re: Garderobe samenstellen, aanvullen en onderhouden
Reactie #3 Gepost op: 21 januari 2009 – 19:54:31
Na zelf even zoeken kwam ik op het volgende: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False-collar.

J

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Re: Garderobe samenstellen, aanvullen en onderhouden
Reactie #4 Gepost op: 21 januari 2009 – 20:28:26
Het volgende kwam ik tegen over witte boorden en manchetten:

Citaat van: bengal-stripe
As I understand it, the contrasting collars came about this way - people would have shirts made for them, in patterns.  When the collars and cuffs would get frayed, they would simply replace the collars and cuff, instead of the entire shirt.  If the shirt-maker did not have the pattern, he would just add collars and cuffs in white, hence the contarsting collar shirt.

It goes back a bit further: shirts used to be tunic shirts (which were pulled over the head) with no collars, but usually with cuffs. In addition you had your collar, which had to be attached with a collar stud in the front and back. Now collars and studs are only used in evening shirts for tails. If you were rich your collars were in cotton or linen and heavily starched, hence the name stiff collar.You stored them in a round leather collar box, usually with a little lidded box inside for your studs. Those stiff collars had to go to commercial laundries, which obviously was quite expensive. Poorer people wore collars made from lacquered cardboard, which were discarded once they were dirty. In the 1920s collars were even made in that new material Bakelite, (just wipe clean). Of course really poor people never wore collars; even with their Sunday-best they wore collarless shirts. Hence the term white and blue collar workers, which probably would have been better as collar and no collar workers.

It was probably until the end of the Second World War that all shirts were collarless, but from the 1920s onwards did you have collars (still separate) in the fabric of the shirt. You would buy your shirt with two additional collars. Collars in matching fabric were never as heavily starched as white ones.

It is only from the 1950s onwards that shirts were buttoned all the way through and had collars attached. Then you would have used a seamstress to attach a replacement collar. If your shirt was sufficiently long and full the fabric would have come from the tail. If you did not have enough you would use white. I believe the prestige shirts with white collars have, goes back to the times when the collars came fresh and stiff out of a collar box.

Citaat van: AskAndyAboutClothes
The “white collar” shirt was a status symbol indicating that the wearer toiled in an environment free of dirt and sweat. Those workers wore blue-collar shirts to help hide the dirt.

The white collar and cuffs shirts on colored/patterned shirts are dressier, so you don't want to pair them with a corduroy sports jacket or leather jacket. They are a traditional shirt, but seem to come in and out of fashion periodically.

The collar was derived from the “ruff”, a detachable pleated collar of linen, supported by a wire frame. It’s that frilly circular neck covering from the late 16th and 17th centuries. Think of Shakespeare or Queen Elizabeth I, and you’ll remember what I’m talking about.

The roots of the ruff were in East where Indians wore collars stiffened with rice water. In 1540 the Queen of Navarre (in the Pyrenees of northern Spain and southwest France, an independent kingdom until it was incorporated into the French crown lands in 1589) began to widen the frill to hide her ugly throat. Catherine de Medici of Italy adopted it and the style spread to England after Mary Tudor married Phillip II of Spain.
The popularity of the “ruff” spread to gentlemen’s shirt cuffs which were decorated with bands of lace until around 1690 when the frills disappeared leaving just the long sleeve.

The 1800’s saw the last burst of glamour in men’s shirts until the 1960’s with chin high collars and rows of pleated ruffles on the chest. In 1840 there is some relief as collars turn down their stiff points to form wings, but shirt bodies sport stripes and floral patterns and studs are more popular than buttons.

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, the neck cloth was so elaborate and voluminous that “Beau” Brummell’s valet sometimes spent a whole morning getting it to sit properly. Brummell set the mode in 1806 for the ruffled shirt for both day and eveningwear. Men's clothing became more somber in the Victorian age especially during the morning of the death of Prince Albert, Queen Victoria’s husband. High neck cloths were abandoned for collars and ties more or less the same as those worn in the 20th century.

The first shirts pulled directly over the head. In 1871 the first “coat style” shirt with buttons all the way down the front was registered in England.

The first modern shirt collars appeared in the late 1800’s and were high, starched, and white collars that attached to the “new style” shirts that opened down the front and not pulled over the head.

The wing collar is a direct descendant of these stand-up collars.

Housewife, Mrs. Hannah Lord Montague (1794 –1878), of 139 Third Street, Troy, New York “invented” the detachable collar in 1827. She got tired of washing her husbands entire shirt when only the collar was dirty.

There was a fling with disposable collars that reached the height of popularity in the 1860’s, but by 1928 the detached collar was gone replaced by the semi-stiff attached collar.

Andy

Bron.

(Mocht de netiquette voorschrijven dat het citeren van andere fora niet gepast is, dan haal ik de citaten weg.)

Daedalus

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Re: Garderobe samenstellen, aanvullen en onderhouden
Reactie #5 Gepost op: 11 februari 2009 – 20:40:30
Na zelf even zoeken kwam ik op het volgende: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False-collar.













A General History Of Detachable Collars On Custom Made Business And Formal Shirts

You may remember the television commercial of old that shows a women yelling - "ring around the collar" - in which she uses a detergent to wash out the grime from her husband´s shirt and collar.

Ring around the collar isn´t simply a Madison Avenue executive´s clever ploy to sell washing detergent. It´s a centuries old problem and more than 150 years ago a Troy women set out to do something about it. However, she had not planned on creating a whole new industry.

Hannah Lord was the daughter of William A. Lord, a Revolutionary War officer and author of Lord´s Military Tactics. She married Orlando Montague, a shoe maker (or blacksmith), on August 14, 1817, and both settled in Troy originally on Second Street.

Mrs. Montague, tired of washing her husband´s shirts because only the collars were dirty decided one day to snip off a collar, wash it, and sew it back on. Mr. Montague, it´s written, agreed to the experiment, and in 1827, the first detachable collar was made at their home at 139 Third Street.

Notice of the event spread through the city and the Rev. Ebenezer Brown took notice. Brown, who was formerly a Methodist Minister, then the owner of a small shop at 285 River Street, was asked several times for the new product that was buzzing around the streets of the city.

Brown saw the need and rushed to fill it. His wife and daughter began cutting, stitching, and laundering the first detachable collars, consisting of 2 ply material, which had to be taped and tied around the neck. These early collars were called "string collars" and cost 25 cents a piece, of two dollars per dozen. Brown would sell and deliver the collars door to door.

His popularity forced him to set up a workshop in the back of his store where he hired several women to do the job, and also outsourced the work. Payment for their labor was in the form of "trade" in his store, and set by his own price. This may have been the first "sweat shop." Brown eventually moved to New York City in 1834.

Orlando Montague, the first person to wear a detachable collar, soon began his own collar factory with business partner Austin Granger in 1834. The Montague & Granger collar factory began at 222 River Street. Besides improving on the string collar, they developed the "Bishop" collar, an upright modification of the turn down collar. Besides collars, they manufactured "dickeys" (detached shirt bosoms), and separate cuffs.

Detachable collars had the problem of leaving gaps between the shirt and collar and this led to the invention of the use of buttons to snap the collars in place. This also led to the development of several new designs of collars.

The original reason that Mrs. Montaque created the detachable collar was to clean it separately from the shirt. With the increase production of collars came the need to wash the thousands of collars being produced. In 1835, Independence Starks, entered the collar making business, and also created the first Troy Laundry at 66 North Second Street (Fifth Avenue today) where he washed not only his own collars but those of competitors as well. Many years later the laundry industry would spark the creation of the first female union in the country.

For the next 50 years many inventions were developed to aid the collar, cuff, and shirt industry and Troy production boomed. By the late 1880´s, detachable collars were being manufactured around the nation.

By the early 20th century, 15,000 people worked in the collar industry in Troy and more than 85% were native born women. Ninety out of every 100 collars worn in America were made here and Troy became world famous as the "Collar City."

In 1901, there were 26 collar and cuff makers and 38 laundries in the city. Wearing a detached white collar gave rise to a new working social class, the "white collar" worker who differentiated themselves from the no or "blue" collar factory worker.

By 1962, only six companies were still making collars and cuffs in Troy and by the 1970´s most had gone out of business or moved South.

Marvin Neitzel Corp, a firm that currently manufacturers nurses uniforms, is the last existing firm which has collar roots. Marvin Neitzel Corporation goes back to 1886 when E. W. Marvin joined the collar firm Gunnison & Son, making it Gunnison & Marvin, later incorporating in 1908 as E. W. Marvin Company. Raymond P. Neitzel joined the firm in 1917 to develop a full line of hospital products and the firm became Marvin Neitzel Corporation in 1931. Marvin Neitzel Corp is the last company to make collars in Troy, ceasing production only a few years ago.

by G. Bruce Boyer
Laatst bewerkt op: 11 februari 2009 – 20:45:10 door Daedalus
cyka blyat

Narcissus

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Re: Afneembare boorden
Reactie #6 Gepost op: 12 februari 2009 – 11:04:02
Voor mij geldt de Alles of Niets Show; gewoon normale (lees; vaste) boorden en manchetten, punt
Consciously breaking rules is an intentional decision, requiring a sophisticated awareness of rules.

I love the level of bravery. It's bold, it's fuck you, it's art.

david

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Re: Afneembare boorden
Reactie #7 Gepost op: 12 februari 2009 – 12:10:28
Het plaatje van het shirt is niet helemaal zoals het volgens mij zou moeten zijn. De boord wordt doorgaans op zijn plaats gehouden door zogenaamde "collar studs". Ik heb 1 shirt (uit nieuwsgierigheid) met afneembare boorden (www.classicwardrobe.co.uk), maar draag het vrijwel nooit omdat ik het met name 's morgens nogal een gedoe vind. Het ziet er wel OK uit trouwens.

Des Esseintes

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Re: Afneembare boorden
Reactie #8 Gepost op: 27 maart 2009 – 00:39:11
Heb zelf 3 afneembare boorden

- 1 2 1/4" High Wing Stiff Collar



- 1 "Military" Collar (hetzelfde model als de Imperial Collar, dus enkele, geheel rechte rand zonder omslag, alleen zonder de open ruimte tussen beide eindes die de Imperial Collar wel heeft)

- 1 Dubbel gerande Collar, ik geloof type Van Heusen.

Godzijdank allen nog vrij van ouderdomssporen e.d.

Heb ze aangeschaft via eBay en een zaakje in Nijmegen waar veel oude troep (tegen te vaak te hoge prijzen) wordt aangeboden. De boorden waren er overigens wel relatief goedkoop: bij speciaalzaken voor bruidskleding betaal je voor een nieuw boord zeker niet minder dan 20 euro per boord.

Je moet het maar even weten, maar dé fabrikant op het gebied van afneembare boorden die nog altijd kwalitatief hoogwaardige boorden maakt tegen een betaalbare prijs is het Engelse Luke Eyres, http://www.luke-eyres.co.uk
Hony soit qui mal y pense